Biscayne Bay

On Friday, the second Biscayne Bay Marine Health Summit will be held at Florida International University to initiate efforts to create long-term, sustainable Biscayne Bay environmental health initiatives.

Specifically, the group wants to address marine debris and other pollutants negatively impacting the Bay.

At this week’s summit, participants will recommend the best management practices, research and policy recommendations for the Miami-Dade County Biscayne Bay Task Force. Representatives from all Miami-Dade County municipalities surrounding Biscayne Bay, including inland communities along canals and Miami River, will be in attendance, as will officials from environmental groups, businesses and educational institutes.

Biscayne Bay

State Attorney Katherine Fernandez-Rundle to provide an update on the recently released Grand Jury Report on the Health of Biscayne Bay.

The shallow, clear water, seagrass meadows and coastal wetlands of Biscayne Bay provide habitat and nurseries for fish species and wildlife, buffer the coast against storm erosion, support boating and water-related recreational activities, and provide over $6 billion annual revenue to our local economy, event organizers say.

However, due to the area’s population growth, the Bay is being negatively impacted by marine debris and pollutants. While organized cleanups of the Biscayne Bay shoreline have helped, the feeling is widely held that a much more aggressive coordinated program is needed.


 If you go...

The summit will be held at 8 a.m. on Friday, September 21 at Florida International University, Biscayne Bay Campus, 3000 N.E. 151st Street, North Miami, Florida

 

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