This past week I was with a client. I adore her, she is a retired college professor with a great sense of humor. She has mobility issues so I usually go to her home to have her papers signed. This last visit she asked me to help her with her iPad.

I added her email account, then on to Amazon Prime. That was an act of God. For 30 minutes we were on the phone because she no longer has the credit card she used to sign up, and the expiration date was needed to confirm her identity. We finally resolved the issue but she could not have done it on her own.

Bill Gates, Tim Cook, Jeff Bezos – Why do you put the onus on us to remember expiration dates on credit cards we no longer have? Why don’t the tech giants and innovators make it easier for seniors to enjoy their products? The new mantra is “age in place.” Apps are being invented to make life easier but not if seniors can’t use them. The number one reason seniors don’t bank online or use apps is security issues. Who can remember all those maiden names and pet’s names . . . especially as we age.

Personal accounts are rarely hacked – it’s the major companies who have breaches and give away our data. Who pays the price, we do.

Here’s what we know: passwords are hard to remember but most users can write them down in one place (as I do) and then look them up. But the security questions? What’s wrong with voice recognition? I’m also confident there are many more technologies out there that are simple to implement. The bottom line, think about logging in from a senior’s point of view – not a techie’s.

Baby boomers are becoming seniors and remain a huge purchasing group. As technology advances, these tech giants must become willing to innovate so that we want to use their products. Everyone knows the three year-olds will adapt to whatever they put out there.

If we make these great products more senior friendly, it could possibly assist in maintaining cognitive function longer. The iPad and Surface tablets would then do the world a favor.

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