Sahara Desert dust-cloud could reach South Florida this week

An immense cloud of dust from the Sahara Desert has been traveling the Atlantic in a west direction and could reach Florida by the end of this week, affecting some storm systems that are arriving in the region, according to meteorologists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

Versión en español

The Saharan dust cloud stretches across the Atlantic since it originated over Africa in recent days and has traveled almost 5,000 miles.

The dust is forecast to rise to the west over the next several days and is forecast to be noticeable in South Florida later in the week. WPLG-Channel 10 meteorologist Brandon Orr said Saturday that South Florida will notice “a very hazy, gray sky,” when the dust from the Sahara Desert in moves into our area in the middle of the week.

The effect that Saharan dust has on the climate of the peninsula depends on the amount of dust that arrives, but it could produce beautiful sunsets in red, orange, and pink. If sufficient dust gets to South Florida, it could limit storm development by drying the atmosphere enough to prevent storms from forming, NOAA meteorologists said.

A storm system is in the making in the Gulf of Mexico and could turn into a tropical depression by midweek and a Tropical Storm could form later Monday off the coast of Carolina.

Forecasts show a rather hostile weather pattern over the Gulf in the middle to the end of the week. Experts advise that those with underlying lung conditions (asthma, respiratory issues, etc.) stay indoors. More at Newsweek.

0
0
0
0
0

Recommended for you