#fishingreport shrimp fishing

Chilly weather of this past week, makes it prime time for shrimp fishing on the causeway

Brrrr! That’s right, it has been downright chilly out there. The good thing is that the bay shrimp like these conditions -- especially when you add some wind to the mix, and we have had some wind this past week.

If you enjoy eating shrimp, then grab yourself a long-handled shrimp net, a lantern or underwater light and a cooler with ice and head over to the Rickenbacker Causeway. Shrimpers have been filling five-gallon buckets with decent size shrimp, which make a great steamed or fried shrimp dinner. You can also try your luck from sea walls and from your boat. This is a nighttime thing, and it helps if the tide is moving.

If shrimping is not your thing, then why not try your luck at catching the fish that like to eat shrimp? When the shrimp pass by a dock with a nighttime light on it, or when the shrimp flow with the tide through the causeway or Bear Cut Bridge, big snook (the Atlantic snook season opened Feb. 1), tarpon, snapper and gag grouper will be there waiting. Take a ¼-ounce Hookup lure jig head, hook a live shrimp to it and cast out into the water, retrieving the rig back to the boat slowly. When you feel that hard thump, set up hard and hold on.

On the offshore scene, fishing has been tough but the fishermen that have kept at it have been rewarded with some decent size dolphin fish, large kingfish, sailfish and blackfin tuna. The tuna are biting best on the overcast days. Live pilchards, threadfin herring, cigar minnows and goggle eye jacks fished free lined or from under a kite were getting most of the strikes.

If the wind is out of the north or northwest, then set your boat up in about 80 feet of water and let the wind push you offshore. Get repeating the drifts till you get some action. Amberjacks and almoco jacks are eating live pinfish fished near the bottom over the wrecks and reefs. Once hooked up try and get that fish to the surface quickly because some very large lemon and bull sharks are out there eating anglers’ fish as they work them to the surface.

Tight Lines and Hot Fishing!


Capt. Alan Sherman, who operates “Get Em” Sportfishing Charters, has been leading fishing charters in South Florida for 30+ years. He can be reached here or by calling (786) 436-2064.

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